COVER STORY

Arturo Gatti Jr. follows his father’s footsteps

Spring 2020 issue

Arturo Gatti Jr. was dressed in a black suit, with a white shirt and a black tie. The dark curls in his hair framed a 4-year-old face that looks just like his father, Arturo “Thunder” Gatti.

 

Arturo Gatti Jr. was dressed in a black suit, with a white shirt and a black tie. The dark curls in his hair framed a 4-year-old face that looks just like his father, Arturo “Thunder” Gatti.

The handsome boy was in the McDonald’s across the street from the International Boxing of Hall of Fame where minutes earlier he stood amid a packed crowd to witness his father being awarded boxing’s highest honor.

“I came to see my daddy,” Arturo Jr. told The Post, clutching a Happy Meal of chicken nuggets.

The young Gatti made the eight-hour drive from Montreal with Victoria Purchio, a friend of Amanda Rodrigues, Gatti’s widow, who was briefly jailed after the boxer’s death in 2009 in Brazil.

Rodrigues said in the letter she was unable to attend the ceremony due to “my current immigration status,” but sent Arturo Jr. with Purchio to “appreciate how much his father was loved by his boxing fans.” Officials at the IBHOF could not be reached for comment.

Many of those close to Gatti, including Lynch, Duva, close friend Michael Sciarra and Chuck Zito believe the boxer was murdered and Amanda was involved, though she has denied involvement. Her presence might have created a potentially volatile situation.

“She doesn’t have a good relationship with his family,” Purchio said. “But she was upset they never mailed an invitation to Junior. This is a very special occasion for him to remember about his dad.”

Purchio said Arturo Jr. is active in gymnastics, soccer, and tennis. “He loves sports just like his dad,” she said.

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TRAVEL

Parma has every right to feel smug

Spring 2020 issue

If reincarnation ever becomes an option, pray you come back as a Parmesan. Where else do you get to cycle to work through streets virtually devoid of cars, lunch on fresh-from-the-attic prosciutto and aged parmigiano reggiano, quaff crisp, refreshing Lambrusco wine in regal art-nouveau cafes, and spend sultry summer evenings listening to classical music in architecturally dramatic opera houses?

 

Starting from its position as one of Italy’s most prosperous cities, Parma has every right to feel smug. More metropolitan than Modena, yet less clamorous than Bologna, this is the city that gave the world a composer called Verdi and enough ham and cheese to start a deli chain. Stopping here isn’t an option, it’s a duty.

Parma is famous for its food and rich gastronomical tradition: two of its specialties are Parmigiano Reggiano cheese (also produced in Reggio Emilia), and Prosciutto di Parma (Parma ham). Parma also claims several stuffed pasta dishes like “tortelli d’erbetta” and “anolini in brodo”.

Starting from its position as one of Italy’s most prosperous cities, Parma has every right to feel smug. More metropolitan than Modena, yet less clamorous than Bologna, this is the city that gave the world a composer called Verdi and enough ham and cheese to start a deli chain. Stopping here isn’t an option, it’s a duty.

If reincarnation ever becomes an option, pray you come back as a Parmesan. Where else do you get to cycle to work through streets virtually devoid of cars, lunch on fresh-from-the-attic prosciutto and aged parmigiano reggiano, quaff crisp, refreshing Lambrusco wine in regal art-nouveau cafes, and spend sultry summer evenings listening to classical music in architecturally dramatic opera houses?

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ARTS & CULTURE

Under The Same Sun

Spring 2020 issue

Carina Francioso, Canadian artist, is the recipient of the Art Renewal Center/Arcadia Contemporary Gallery Award. Some of her recent works are now exhibited at Arcadia Contemporary Gallery, California, US, until March 2nd.?

 

The paintings that Carina has presented in the occasion of the Arc Vision 2019 at Arcadia Gallery are simply breathtaking. She has created a complete portrait of the sea, viewed from all the different viewpoints that characterizes it.

She makes us feel peaceful sensations in the small work titled “The Adriatic Glistens“, where the monochromatic shades of the blue scale with white sparkles create a sort of abstract form.

The sun reflects itself in her painting “Sotto Lo Stesso Sole (Under The Same Sun)“, spreading its golden light everywhere on the scene and creating a meditative and hypnotic movement. Feelings are totally different in “Remembering Ka’anapali“, in which with different perspective and colours, Carina shows a wave that breaks to the shore, giving us even the illusory feeling of perceiving the sound of the sea.

This path leads us to what we can define her masterpiece: “Il Soffio della Vita“, a monumental two canvas diptych to which she worked for a whole year, giving every part of herself to this piece and proving herself as an artist. In this work you can see tumultuous waves that reveal the power of the sea in all its wild nature.

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RECIPE

Eggplant Parm

Spring 2020 issue

Recipe prepared by Chef Luca Cianciulli at his restaurant Moccione (Villeray, Montreal)

 

The Parmigiana is a simple and tasty meal that can be enjoyed immediately or frozen to keep handy when needed. Its name, Parmigiana di Melanzane, suggests that it originates from Parma, however the origin of the dish is uncertain and is more widely considered a traditional food from the regions of Campania and Sicilia.

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